Monday, May 25, 2020

Dragons Essay - 2578 Words

Dragons What’s the first thing people think when they hear the word â€Å"dragon?† Most Americans and Europeans probably envision a huge scaly green beast, one that sits on a hoard of golden treasures and breathes fire. Asians are more likely to think of a benevolent snake-like creature, one that controls rains and rivers. And some people will think of the dragons in movies, or in books, which come in innumerable shapes, sizes, and dispositions. Practically every culture on Earth has dragons of some kind. The broadest way of categorizing dragons is into Western and Eastern dragons, though some of the dragons in the media have distinct characteristics as well. And then, of course, is the ultimate question: did they exist? Western†¦show more content†¦Probably the best-known â€Å"book dragons† are those in Anne McCaffrey’s Pern series. Pernese dragons are large, ranging from 20 to 45 meters in length, depending on color. Greens and golds are the smallest and largest, respectively, and female. Browns, blues, and bronzes are male. All but the gold queens chew firestone in order to fight Thread, a dangerous parasitic menace that falls periodically from the sky. The dragons are Western in form, but their eyes are multi-faceted and change color depending on the dragon’s mood. They are telepathic, and â€Å"Impress† immediately after hatching, bonding telepathically with a human. Humans thus chosen are called dragonriders, and the bond lasts until one of the pair dies. Pernese dragons have the unique ability to take themselves and their riders â€Å"between† one place and another almost instantaneously. Highly intelligent, Pernese dragons inspire awe in all who se e them (McCaffrey, 274-6). Dragons in the media are usually based on Western dragons. Draco, for example, is a perfect example of a Western dragon: four legs, two leathery wings, breathes fire, covered in scales. His attitude, however, is more like that of an Eastern dragon: once the misunderstandings are resolved, he is determined to be helpful (Dragonheart). Elliot from Pete’s Dragon also is Western in appearance, though a far cry from the fierce killers of most legends. He, too, has a more benevolent attitude. By contrast, Mushu, Mulan’sShow MoreRelatedIs Dragons A Dragon?1141 Words   |  5 Pageslie-consuming dragon, lies take the form of monsters. The size of said monsters depend on the severity of the lie being told, and how badly the liar doesn’t want to be found out. But this doesn’t apply to all dragons, however. Dragons come into existence to fulfill the need or a strong wish of a human. A human who has seen all of their loved ones die and firmly wishes for solace will b ring about an immortal dragon. A human who has been trapped all their life will bring about a dragon with powers ofRead MoreSummary Of The Dragon 1400 Words   |  6 Pages The dragon took two more steps, and with each step, he snorted a short burst of flames out of both sides of his nose. Hearing the crunching of the bushes and twigs under the dragons weight sent a cold chill run up Titus‘s back. His hand holding the wand began to shake ever-so-lightly, then his arm dropped to his side. Replanting his right foot in front of him, Titus again raised his arm pointing the wand at the green monster. The dragon paused. It looked as if he was taking a deep breathRead MoreDragon as a Metaphor1646 Words   |  7 PagesDragonslayer story was the English epic, Beowulf, written sometime between the eighth and eleventh centuries. The story of the Dragonslayer is that of a Hero, who starts off insignificant, but after his journey, is strong enough to face and defeat the evil Dragon. The Hero’s Journey is split into three phases; in order they are: Separation, Initiation, and the Return. The story of Beowulf was written for a specific purpose, other than creating a whole genre. The bards who wrote it as though it was a historyRead MoreThe Origin Of The Dragon2970 Words   |  12 Pages7 October 2014 Dragons Transformed Dragon have been predominant in many cultures for centuries. Its function may differ culture to culture but its identity has become a universal symbol; we all have the dragon in common. Dragons are everywhere and appear to be the most documented creature in all of ancient history, second to that of the human being (Isaacs 19). These magnificent creatures like any other monster have an origin. Scholars, however, debate the origin of the dragon pointing to severalRead MoreThe Dragons Of Legend : The Epic Of Gilgamesh1063 Words   |  5 Pagesâ€Å"The dragons of legend are strangely like actual creatures that have lived in the past. They are much like the great reptiles which inhabited the earth long before man is supposed to have appeared on earth. Dragons were generally evil and destructive. Every country had them in its mythology.† (Knox, Wilson, â€Å"Dragon,† The World Book Encyclopedia, 1973) Dragons are told in almost every culture known to man. Descriptions of t he Dragon have been written, drawn, and told in culture that could have neverRead MoreIs Dungeons Dragons?2482 Words   |  10 PagesTo live out an adventurous story, where a small group of friends band together to become the heroes fighting danger and inventing new ways to solve problems, this is Dungeons Dragons. Ethan Gilsdorf, DD enthusiast, explained in his TEDx talk that many tweens sat in their basements eating chips and gorging themselves on Mountain Dew while playing this new exciting take on a classic type war game . Magic, adventure, companionship, and ridiculousness become available to each player. Gilsdorf expressedRead MoreThe King Of The Fire Dragons1846 Words   |  8 PagesOnce upon a time, there lived a magical world. This world, which was be ruled by dragons, was in the middle of the most terrible war ever imagined in the history of the land. It was a war between the two most powerful species of dragon, the Ice Dragons and the Fire Dragons. Now, In the mids t of all this havoc was the prince of the Fire Dragons who had hope that this battle could be resolved. Legend has it that there was a magical item, known as the Golden Stone, which had the power to grant aRead MoreA Captive of Dragons1063 Words   |  5 Pages† I made a face, not truly knowing who she was talking about. â€Å"I still don’t get why it needs to happen so soon...† â€Å"It’s probably so the dragons don’t get you,† teased Evan, my younger brother, and true heir to the crown. I stuck my tongue at him, but mother did not take the jab at me as lightly. â€Å"Evan, how dare you say that. You know the curse of the dragons, and it is not a topic to be joked about. You know better than that.† â€Å"Sorry,† Evan mumbled. There was truth to Evan’s statement thoughRead MoreDragons: A Global Phenomenon Essay1229 Words   |  5 Pageshistory is the dragon. A creature that not only appears in a variety of cultures, but has individual symbolism and traits attuned with each. Even today the idea of what is a dragon can differ from each individual. While most people in the modern day believe that all dragons are fire breathing terrors, it is a misconception of the idealism behind dragons. Dragons have taken many forms from fire-breathing monsters, to the divine spiritual bringer of wisdom and rain. While dragons are cemented intoRead MoreEssay on The Fifty - First Dragon801 Words   |  4 Pages â€Å"The Fifty - First Dragon† nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Settings: The first setting is in a knight school where Gawaine is taught how to be a knight. It also takes place in the forest where he beheads all the dragons and is almost fooled into being eaten. nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;nbsp;Plot: This story is about a student becoming a knight with no spirit at all named Gawaine le Coeur-Hardy. He was considered the least promising of all the pupils. The headmaster of the school thought he

Thursday, May 14, 2020

The Chrysanthemums By John Steinbeck Analysis - 935 Words

In John Steinbeck‘s short story â€Å"The Chrysanthemums † Elisa Gives off the impression that she is not satisfied with her life. She can’t put a finger on her source of discomfort, but knows that she is not quite satisfied with how her life is continuing. Elisa’s husband doesn’t give her the proper attention she is craving, so elisa turns to her only sense of compassion; her garden. Elisa uses her beloved chrysanthemums to express her inner feelings about what it’s like to truly care for something. Elisa’s garden brings her joy and passion, hence the reasoning she is always spending her time there. Elisa realizes that in order to be happy with your life, you have to deal with the pain along the way. Throughout the story, Elisa struggles to†¦show more content†¦She is pushed into being dependent on her husband and the only way out is her garden. Elisa does not reveal herself to anybody. She is very quiet and keeps to herself a nd her garden until she meets the tinker. When Elisa meets the tinker she begins to let a little part of her personality go. â€Å"Elisa took off her gloves and stuffed them in her apron pocket with her scissors† (BL, 209). Elisa taking off her gloves symbolizes her expressing herself. She is now exposed to another human and the outside world. Elisa is also interacting like she never would typically do. Elisa begins to open up to the tinker and feel what it feels like to interact further than her usual conversations. She begins to reveal herself and allow him to see a side of her that is typically hidden. Another piece of symbolism in the story is when the tinker leaned over Elisas fence. This symbolised trust between Elisa and the tinker because Elisa does not let anybody get close to her, or her garden. Elisa soon removes her hat and that symbolises that she is confident and found a little stretch of freedom. When the tinker realizes the beauty of Elisa flowers, a new sense of passion pours out of Elisa. She feels excited and full of joy because her dedication and hard work was finally noticed. Toward the end of the story, Elisa gives the tinker the chrysanthemums. This symbolizing trust between them. When ELisa gave the tinker her flowers, she also gave him a piece ofShow MoreRelatedThe Chrysanthemums By John Steinbeck Analysis949 Words   |  4 PagesBiography John Ernst Steinbeck was born in Salinas, California, which is where the short story, â€Å"The Chrysanthemums† is set in 1902. He won the Nobel Prize in Literature and his held in high regard, but not quite as high as Faulkner and Hemingway. Steinbeck died of a heart attack in Salinas, California in 1963 (Levant). Overview Steinbeck published the short story The Chrysanthemums in 1937 and included as part of his collection The Long Valley the following year. In the story, Henry AllenRead MoreAnalysis Of Chrysanthemums By John Steinbeck971 Words   |  4 PagesChrysanthemums† has many different ideas of what women’s roles are in today’s society. I think one of the key themes is gender inequality. Elisa is a passionate, independent, and a beautiful person inside and out. And no matter what she does or says, her husband will never see her for more than an object. Because the story is written through Elisa’s point of view and is set in 1938. Because of this, it really portrays where women stood at that time. Taking place during winter in Salinas Valley,Read MoreAnalysis Of John Steinbeck s The Chrysanthemums 1256 Words   |  6 PagesComparative Essay In â€Å"Chrysanthemums† john Steinbeck, the author, focuses on Elisa Allen, one of the main characters. She is presented as weak in that her daily activity consisted of tending her garden of chrysanthemums; Steinbeck focuses on how they provide insight into Elisa and how she relates to them, religiously. He implies that even though she fits a weak character, there are places in the narrative at the beginning that suggest some strong points and her longing towards the end. There areRead MoreAnalysis Of John Steinbeck s The Chrysanthemums 1532 Words   |  7 PagesJohn Steinbeck’s short story â€Å"The Chrysanthemums† shows a time when women are controlled and restrained to a traditional lifestyle. It portrays a struggle for equality that is played out through the eyes of the third person narrator. In telling the story, the narrator depicts the story through speech, actions and appearances of the main character, Elisa. Her place in the story is that in a w orld of masculinity during the times of the Great Depression and a fight to keep a bit of her happinessRead MoreAn Analysis Of John Steinbeck s The Chrysanthemums 1025 Words   |  5 PagesRichard Courtney ENG 1110 December 22, 2016 An Unsatisfied Life John Steinbeck’s â€Å"The Chrysanthemums† is a short story about a woman named Elisa and her unhappiness with her life. She is a woman living in a man’s world in the late 1930’s. Elisa and her husband, Henry, are childless. She is confined to a lonely life where she cares for her husband, their farm house, and her precious chrysanthemums. Throughout the story Steinbeck indicates Elisa’s struggle as a woman who wants more out of her lifeRead MoreSymbolism in The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck Essay1547 Words   |  7 PagesSymbolism in The Chrysanthemums by John Steinbeck The Chrysanthemums, one of John Steinbecks masterpieces, describes a lonely farmers wife, Elisa Allen. Elisa Allens physical appearance is very mannish yet still allows a hint of a feminine side to peek through. John Steinbeck brings symbolism into play to represent Elisa Allens frustrations and hidden passions. Isolation is another representation through symbolism found in The Chrysanthemums. Elisas failing detached marriage is representedRead MoreThe Chrysanthemums By John Steinbeck982 Words   |  4 Pagesâ€Å"The Chrysanthemums† is a short story written by John Steinbeck. The story was originally published in 1937 before later being released as a part of his The Long Valley collection. This is an important story as it expresses women in a way that is more realistic, showing their true boredom, ambition, and capabilities. Some scholars interpreted this story differently, but C. Kenneth Pellow interprets it as â€Å"radically feministic.† The Great Depression was fi nally ending and women’s rights were risingRead MoreEssay on Analysis of The Chrysanthemums1139 Words   |  5 PagesAnalysis of The Chrysanthemums The short story The Chrysanthemums gives insight into the life of its author. John Steinbeck was born on February 27, 1902, in Salinas, California. The locale of the story is of key resemblance to the Salinas in which Steinbeck was born and bread. Salinas was a typical American small town, [differing] only in location and a few distinctive features (McCarthy 3). The protagonist of this story, Elisa Allen, also resembles Steinbecks first wife. SteinbeckRead MoreCharacter Analysis the Chrysanthemums1220 Words   |  5 PagesEngl. 1302 April 15, 2013 Paper 1 Character Analysis â€Å"The Chrysanthemums† by John Steinbeck John Steinbeck was born in 1902 and lived during what is said to be the most troubled time in American history. Steinbeck was alive during the Dust Bowl paired with the Great Depression, which is believed to be the reason for his almost melancholiac tone in some of his works but he seemed a very diverse writer. Along with â€Å"The Chrysanthemums†, Steinbeck is the author of the well-known and famous novelRead More The Chrysanthemums Essay1649 Words   |  7 PagesJohn Steinbeck’s, The Chrysanthemums, was published in 1938 in a book of short stories, entitled The Long Valley. The Chrysanthemums has been a rather powerful draw for scholars because of its wide gap for interpretations and analysis of its main protagonist character, Elisa Allen and also the unique descriptions used to portray the deeper meaning behind the setting of the story. Themes of sexuality, oppression of women, as well as other numerous types of conflict portrayed in this rather somber

Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Case Study Coffee Shop And Its Impact On Organizational...

Background of the organization I have been selected by the Dreamx Coffee Parlour for the purpose of conducting a survey about the causes of ethical breaches by its employees and its impact on organizational culture. This coffee shop has been in operation since a decade. The Coffee shop provides the coffee lovers a unique taste of Coffee with a blend of ancient Italian roaster. The coffee shop also offers juices, sandwiches, snacks, chocolates, cakes as side orders. It primarily employs college students as its employees and the management of the coffee shop constitutes of senior students. So, its management lacks experience and skills of leadership and managing employees in a way that yields positive performance and results. Moreover, the organization is poorly structured that has resulted in the decline in its revenue and profit. The purpose of employing students as its employees are to get the work done in in-convenient hours and under low wages. These practices have demotivated emp loyees resulting in escalation of their turnover intentions. Survey Introduction The purpose or aim of every organization is to establish such an organizational culture and behavior among its employees that helps in the achievement of ideal ethical standards. There are certain determinants that play a critical role in helping achieve the right organizational culture. Some of these include personal moral intensity, social ties, codes of ethics, the locus of control and Machiavellianism. TheseShow MoreRelatedCase Study : Coffee Shop And Its Impact On Organizational Culture1427 Words   |  6 PagesDreamx Coffee Parlour for the purpose of conducting a survey about the causes of ethical breaches by its employees and its impact on organizational culture. This coffee shop has been in operation since a decade. The Coffee shop provides the coffee lovers a unique taste of Coffee with a blend of ancient Italian roaster. The coffee shop also offers juices, sandwiches, snacks, chocolates, cakes as side orders. It primarily employs college students as its employees and the management of the coffee shopRead MoreCase Starbucks Returns to its Roots Essay1059 Words   |  5 Pagesï » ¿Organizational Behavior and Development Case Study Starbucks Returns to Its Roots Submission date: 9-12-2013 1. Whenever a company grows that rapidly as Starbucks did, from starting with 11 stores in 1987 to 7,000 stores nowadays, a lot of factors change. First of all, a major factor that changes when a company grows that rapidly is the organizational structure of the company. This can be especially true when the organization begins to expand to other geographicRead MoreStarbucks s Organizational Culture And Its Impact On Organizational Success1210 Words   |  5 Pages516: Managing People and Performance Dr. Stanley Randolph The Effectiveness of Starbucks’ Organizational Culture and its Impact on Organizational Success in Global Economy It is thoroughly clear that since 1990 The Starbucks Company had a major impact on, first the American, then the global coffee shop market. In the US alone, America housed just under 200 â€Å"freestanding† coffee houses, today, there are well over 14,000 stores, 30 percent of which is owned by the Starbucks’ corporationRead MoreValues in the Workplace1483 Words   |  6 Pagestopic will be broken down into three parts. The first one will reflect the types of the organizational values and the difference between personal values and those of a workplace. Also, it will include the reasons that maximize the distance between values leading to different consequences. The second part will examine the possible strategies and methods that may minimize the gap between personal and organizational norms. In other words, I am going to analyze various approaches that will make work-relatedRead MoreImprovement Strategies for Costa Coffee4577 Words   |  18 Pages1.2. Company Information 4 1.3. Problem Statement 5 1.4. Purpose of Research 6 1.5. Research Questions 6 1.6. Aims and Objectives 6 2. Literature Review 7 2.1. Organizational Performance 9 2.1.1. Concept of Organizational Performance 10 2.1.2. Measuring Organizational Performance 10 2.2. Organizational Culture 11 2.2.1. Innovation and Adaptability 12 2.2.2. Loyalty 13 2.2.3. Mission 13 2.2.4. Values and Beliefs 13 2.2.5. Involvement 14 2.3. Theoretical Framework 14 Read MoreStarbucks2428 Words   |  10 PagesStarbucks is considers the one of the most famous coffee store brand in the world, based on the case we can find that it is on the leading position of coffee market, it has a significant sales growth compare other brand in the market. But in recent year it seems start to facing more challenges from different aspect and these challenges had became a resistance of its business expansion. 1. Financial Analysis Income statement: Based on the case we can find that there is a huge net income increaseRead MoreThe Economics Behind The Coffee Shop Market3506 Words   |  15 Pages1. INTRODUCTION: The economics behind the coffee shop culture As a continuously expanding industry, in which the adoption of trends such as â€Å"single-origin bean† or â€Å"flat whites† can represent the difference between a decent quarter and an excellent one, the coffee shop market in Britain proves to be an interesting field of study in a nation otherwise known for its tea-drinking, pub-loving mentality. With a 6.2 billion pounds turnover in 2013 alone, and an estimated number of 16,015 outlets acrossRead MoreSocial Responsibility in Stakeholder Theory1509 Words   |  7 PagesTable of Contents 1. Introduction 2 2. Social responsibility in stakeholder theory 3 2.1 Why social responsibility? 3 3. Limitations 4 4. Case study examples: Starbucks amp; Nike 4 5. Conclusion 5 6. References 6 7. Appendixes 9 Appendix A 9 Appendix B 10 1. Introduction This report focuses on social responsibility issue focusing on stakeholder theory. Social responsibility will be introduced and defined based on stakeholder theory. Next, analysis on the importance and limitationsRead MoreCoffee Shop Draft Proposal5306 Words   |  22 Pageswithout breakfast and a cup of coffee in the table of the Filipinos. Sometimes they only drink coffee to fill up their stomach when they are in hurry for office or even for school; it keeps them awake. They say that it help’s blood to flow better. Coffee shops or coffeehouses have been in use since 16th century, particularly in the Middle East, where Turkish coffee house was drunk and men played board games or read books and listened to music. Many people find that coffee contains stimulants calledRead MoreStrategic Management1702 Words   |  7 Pagesleadership The organizational hierarchy and economic conditions directly impacts the roles and functions of business leaders. Therefore, it is imperative that one reviews organizational structure in order to understand leadership traits and characteristics. Due to the constantly evolving economy, companies are aiming to adopt a more elastic strategic management configuration so as to assist the maximization of the employee satisfaction and to get rid of any inflexibility in the organizational structures Case Study Coffee Shop And Its Impact On Organizational... Background of the organization I have been selected by the Dreamx Coffee Parlour for the purpose of conducting a survey about the causes of ethical breaches by its employees and its impact on organizational culture. This coffee shop has been in operation since a decade. The Coffee shop provides the coffee lovers a unique taste of Coffee with a blend of ancient Italian roaster. The coffee shop also offers juices, sandwiches, snacks, chocolates, cakes as side orders. It primarily employs college students as its employees and the management of the coffee shop constitutes of senior students. So, its management lacks experience and skills of leadership and managing employees in a way that yields positive performance and results. Moreover, the organization is poorly structured that has resulted in the decline in its revenue and profit. The purpose of employing students as its employees are to get the work done in in-convenient hours and under low wages. These practices have demotivated emp loyees resulting in escalation of their turnover intentions. Survey Introduction The purpose or aim of every organization is to establish such an organizational culture and behavior among its employees that helps in the achievement of ideal ethical standards. There are certain determinants that play a critical role in helping achieve the right organizational culture. Some of these include personal moral intensity, social ties, codes of ethics, the locus of control and Machiavellianism. TheseShow MoreRelatedCase Study : Coffee Shop And Its Impact On Organizational Culture1427 Words   |  6 PagesDreamx Coffee Parlour for the purpose of conducting a survey about the causes of ethical breaches by its employees and its impact on organizational culture. This coffee shop has been in operation since a decade. The Coffee shop provides the coffee lovers a unique taste of Coffee with a blend of ancient Italian roaster. The coffee shop also offers juices, sandwiches, snacks, chocolates, cakes as side orders. It primarily employs college students as its employees and the management of the coffee shopRead MoreCase Starbucks Returns to its Roots Essay1059 Words   |  5 Pagesï » ¿Organizational Behavior and Development Case Study Starbucks Returns to Its Roots Submission date: 9-12-2013 1. Whenever a company grows that rapidly as Starbucks did, from starting with 11 stores in 1987 to 7,000 stores nowadays, a lot of factors change. First of all, a major factor that changes when a company grows that rapidly is the organizational structure of the company. This can be especially true when the organization begins to expand to other geographicRead MoreStarbucks s Organizational Culture And Its Impact On Organizational Success1210 Words   |  5 Pages516: Managing People and Performance Dr. Stanley Randolph The Effectiveness of Starbucks’ Organizational Culture and its Impact on Organizational Success in Global Economy It is thoroughly clear that since 1990 The Starbucks Company had a major impact on, first the American, then the global coffee shop market. In the US alone, America housed just under 200 â€Å"freestanding† coffee houses, today, there are well over 14,000 stores, 30 percent of which is owned by the Starbucks’ corporationRead MoreValues in the Workplace1483 Words   |  6 Pagestopic will be broken down into three parts. The first one will reflect the types of the organizational values and the difference between personal values and those of a workplace. Also, it will include the reasons that maximize the distance between values leading to different consequences. The second part will examine the possible strategies and methods that may minimize the gap between personal and organizational norms. In other words, I am going to analyze various approaches that will make work-relatedRead MoreImprovement Strategies for Costa Coffee4577 Words   |  18 Pages1.2. Company Information 4 1.3. Problem Statement 5 1.4. Purpose of Research 6 1.5. Research Questions 6 1.6. Aims and Objectives 6 2. Literature Review 7 2.1. Organizational Performance 9 2.1.1. Concept of Organizational Performance 10 2.1.2. Measuring Organizational Performance 10 2.2. Organizational Culture 11 2.2.1. Innovation and Adaptability 12 2.2.2. Loyalty 13 2.2.3. Mission 13 2.2.4. Values and Beliefs 13 2.2.5. Involvement 14 2.3. Theoretical Framework 14 Read MoreStarbucks2428 Words   |  10 PagesStarbucks is considers the one of the most famous coffee store brand in the world, based on the case we can find that it is on the leading position of coffee market, it has a significant sales growth compare other brand in the market. But in recent year it seems start to facing more challenges from different aspect and these challenges had became a resistance of its business expansion. 1. Financial Analysis Income statement: Based on the case we can find that there is a huge net income increaseRead MoreThe Economics Behind The Coffee Shop Market3506 Words   |  15 Pages1. INTRODUCTION: The economics behind the coffee shop culture As a continuously expanding industry, in which the adoption of trends such as â€Å"single-origin bean† or â€Å"flat whites† can represent the difference between a decent quarter and an excellent one, the coffee shop market in Britain proves to be an interesting field of study in a nation otherwise known for its tea-drinking, pub-loving mentality. With a 6.2 billion pounds turnover in 2013 alone, and an estimated number of 16,015 outlets acrossRead MoreSocial Responsibility in Stakeholder Theory1509 Words   |  7 PagesTable of Contents 1. Introduction 2 2. Social responsibility in stakeholder theory 3 2.1 Why social responsibility? 3 3. Limitations 4 4. Case study examples: Starbucks amp; Nike 4 5. Conclusion 5 6. References 6 7. Appendixes 9 Appendix A 9 Appendix B 10 1. Introduction This report focuses on social responsibility issue focusing on stakeholder theory. Social responsibility will be introduced and defined based on stakeholder theory. Next, analysis on the importance and limitationsRead MoreCoffee Shop Draft Proposal5306 Words   |  22 Pageswithout breakfast and a cup of coffee in the table of the Filipinos. Sometimes they only drink coffee to fill up their stomach when they are in hurry for office or even for school; it keeps them awake. They say that it help’s blood to flow better. Coffee shops or coffeehouses have been in use since 16th century, particularly in the Middle East, where Turkish coffee house was drunk and men played board games or read books and listened to music. Many people find that coffee contains stimulants calledRead MoreStrategic Management1702 Words   |  7 Pagesleadership The organizational hierarchy and economic conditions directly impacts the roles and functions of business leaders. Therefore, it is imperative that one reviews organizational structure in order to understand leadership traits and characteristics. Due to the constantly evolving economy, companies are aiming to adopt a more elastic strategic management configuration so as to assist the maximization of the employee satisfaction and to get rid of any inflexibility in the organizational structures

Tuesday, May 5, 2020

French Education System free essay sample

In France, education has a clear goal: the system must always produce a group of well-educated individuals with a common culture, language and abilities that can then serve the State. The French educational system has a very large emphasis on content, culturally specific knowledge, scientific and mathematic knowledge. The system is designed to serve the needs of the state; the individuality and originality are not considered worth while values The French Republic has 60 million inhabitants, living in the 22 regions of metropolitan France and four overseas departments (1. million). Despite the fact that the population is growing slightly (up 0. 4% a year), the number and proportion of young people under 25 are, however, falling: there are now fewer than 19 million of them in metropolitan France, i. e. 32% of the total population, compared with 40% around 1970 and 35% at the time of the 1990 census. France is seeing a slow aging of the population — less marked however than in other neighbouring countries (Germany and Italy), especially as the annual number of births is currently increasing slightly. We will write a custom essay sample on French Education System or any similar topic specifically for you Do Not WasteYour Time HIRE WRITER Only 13.90 / page 5 million pupils and students, i. e. a quarter of the population, are in the education system. Just over 2 million are in higher education. In 1999, Frances GDP was close to FF 9,000 billion (EUR 1,330 billion), i. e. FF 150,000 (EUR 22,000) per inhabitant. Of this total, just over FF 600 billion (EUR 95 billion) were devoted to initial or continuing education: 7. 2% of GDP. As far as school education spending is concerned, France is in a middle position, behind the Nordic countries (Sweden and Denmark), but fairly significantly ahead of Italy and Japan. France has a workforce today of 26 million, of whom fewer than 2 million are unemployed: the unemployment rate recently fell to below 9%. 6% of the labor force (about 1. 5 million jobs, including 1 million civil servants and local government officers) are undergoing training. Educational Structure Around 13 million pupils attend school in France. The system is a unified one, whose present general structure (primary schools, colleges, lycees) was gradually put in place during the 1960s and 1970s, ending the formerly more compartmentalized system which was based on a clear separation between rimary and secondary education. Since the 1970s, France has also had an outstanding record with respect to the development of pre-school education; all 3- to 5-year-olds can go to nursery classes. Since 1967, school attendance has been compulsory for those from 6 to 16 years of age. France has 60,000 primary schools catering to pupils during their first five years of formal education: the first three years (CP cours preparatoire cours elementaire 1 and 2) provide a grounding in the basic skills. The next stage CM1/CM2 (cours moyen 1 and 2) takes the children up to the end of primary school. Secondary schooling is divided into two successive stages, known as cycles. From 11 to 15 years, almost all children now attend a college, taking them from form 6 (sixieme) to form 3 (troisieme) (1). Since 1975 there has been a single mixed-ability college for all pupils regardless of their level of achievement. After form 3, they move onto a general, technical or vocational lycee. These prepare pupils for the corresponding baccalaureatexaminations (referred to as le bac), which they normally take at the age of 18.

Saturday, April 11, 2020

Computer forensic investigations usually follow th Essays

Computer forensic investigations usually follow the standard digital forensic process or phases: acquisition, examination, analysis and reporting. Investigations are performed on static data (i.e. acquired images ) rather than "live" systems. This is a change from early forensic practices where a lack of specialist tools led to investigators commonly working on live data. Techniques [ edit ] A number of techniques are used during computer forensics investigations and much has been written on the many techniques used by law enforcement in particular. See, e.g., "Defending Child Pornography Cases". Cross-drive analysis A forensic technique that correlates information found on multiple hard drives . The process, still being researched, can be used to identify social networks and to perform anomaly detection . [9] [10] Live analysis The examination of computers from within the operating system using custom forensics or existing sysadmin tools to extract evidence. The practice is useful when dealing with Encrypting File Systems , for example, where the encryption keys may be collected and, in some instances, the logical hard drive volume may be imaged (known as a live acquisition) before the computer is shut down. Deleted files A common technique used in computer forensics is the recovery of deleted files. Modern forensic software have their own tools for recovering or carving out deleted data. [11] Most operating systems and file systems do not always erase physical file data, allowing investigators to reconstruct it from the physical disk sectors . File carving involves searching for known file headers within the disk image and reconstructing deleted materials. Stochastic forensics A method which uses stochastic properties of the computer system to investigate activities lacking digital artifacts. Its chief use is to investigate data theft . Steganography One of the techniques used to hide data is via steganography, the process of hiding data inside of a picture or digital image. An example would be to hide pornographic images of children or other information that a given criminal does not want to have discovered. Computer forensics professionals can fight this by looking at the hash of the file and comparing it to the original image (if available.) While the image appears exactly the same, the hash changes as the data changes. [12] Volatile data [ edit ] When seizing evidence, if the machine is still active, any information stored solely in RAM that is not recovered before powering down may be lost. [8] One application of "live analysis" is to recover RAM data (for example, using Microsoft's COFEE tool, windd, WindowsSCOPE ) prior to removing an exhibit. CaptureGUARD Gateway bypasses Windows login for locked computers, allowing for the analysis and acquisition of physical memory on a locked computer. RAM can be analyzed for prior content after power loss, because the electrical charge stored in the memory cells takes time to dissipate, an effect exploited by the cold boot attack . The length of time that data is recoverable is increased by low temperatures and higher cell voltages. Holding unpowered RAM below 60C helps preserve residual data by an order of magnitude, improving the chances of successful recovery. However, it can be impractical to do this during a field examination. [13] Some of the tools needed to extract volatile data, however, require that a computer be in a forensic lab, both to maintain a legitimate chain of evidence, and to facilitate work on the machine. If necessary, law enforcement applies techniques to move a live, running desktop computer. These include a mouse jiggler , which moves the mouse rapidly in small movements and prevents the computer from going to sleep accidentally. Usually, an uninterruptible power supply (UPS) provides power during transit. However, one of the easiest ways to capture data is by actually saving the RAM data to disk. Various file systems that have journaling features such as NTFS and ReiserFS keep a large portion of the RAM data on the main storage media during operation, and these page files can be reassembled to reconstruct what was in RAM at that time. [14] Analysis tools [ edit ] See also: List of digital forensics tools A number of open source and commercial tools exist for computer forensics investigation. Typical forensic analysis includes a manual review of

Tuesday, March 10, 2020

Photos of Vietnam War

Photos of Vietnam War Introduction Experiences of journalists in the Vietnam War changed media reporting of wars today. The media reported uncensored events of the war to the public. These stories and photographs changed the publics opinion about the war. The War took place between 1957 and 1975 in South Vietnam.Advertising We will write a custom dissertation sample on Photos of Vietnam War specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More The Vietnam War claimed over 60,000 American soldiers and over 2 million Vietnamese. These figures are estimates as the exact number of casualties are extremely difficult to know. Arguably, this was the most unpopular war among Americans. Critics and veterans believed that explicit and negative coverage of the war changed public opinion about it. Media have the capacity to shape opinions i.e. they can change the way we â€Å"think, feel, and react about situations and events† (Altheide, 2009). This explains why the two iconic phot os changed Americans view about the War. The first one depicts napalmed child (Accident Napalm of 1972). The second is the execution of an alleged Viet Cong soldier by an American marine in the street of Saigon (Tet Execution of 1968). The review of literature and analysis shall show effects of the mass media on viewers and their views regarding the war. The analysis shall also involve common themes that emerged during the war due to media involvement and iconic photos that changed reporting style of subsequent wars. These two photos reflect moments of horrors during the Vietnam War. Critics considered these images iconic because of emotions they created among American viewers. In order to understand image representations of the Vietnam War, this study shall rely on semiotic analyses of photos through identifications of central ideas. We shall explore meanings behind photographs using signs and expressions, and how they relate to cultural aspects of society. Semiotic analyses enable us to understand meanings attributed to images and viewers’ perceptions of images in a given social context.Advertising Looking for dissertation on art and design? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More Different aspects of these photos can have different meanings to different people based on their cultural orientations. These iconic photos reveal the importance of photojournalism in reporting war events. Reflexive-dialogic introduction It is not possible to explain why the US government did not regulate media coverage of the Vietnam War. Americans watched all events of the war and viewed photographs obtained during the war. The media raised public concerns about the war and the rising number of casualties of the US soldiers. The question is whether events of the Vietnam War created better opportunities for media reporters, photographers and commentators to question Americans involvement in the War. The role of the media in the Vietnam War also raises issues of what the media ought to censor and report to the public. For instance, issues of Tet Offensive, Accidental Napalm, and other gruesome events that showed death and massive destruction created impressions that the Vietnam War was like that in Saigon and other areas. It could be that media representations of the war angered soldiers. Soldiers believed that media had biased reporting especially in the Tet Offensive where the media portrayed that the US was losing the battle, and the only way out was to withdraw from the war. This is because a section of the media portrayed dead US soldiers killed during the war. This kind of reporting gave critics opportunities to accuse mass media of bias. On the other hand, the media also claimed that they were reflecting perception of Americans regarding the war. Many issues could have changed Americans opinions about the war. These could have been increases in taxes to cater for costs of the war and the rising number of casualties. These issues were influential during the war than media reporting. Critics wonder whether media undermined activities of soldiers and the government in the Vietnam War.Advertising We will write a custom dissertation sample on Photos of Vietnam War specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page Learn More The clash between the military and the media is inevitable. The media need to report events as they are while the military focuses on winning the war and minimizing the number of casualties. Reporting these events means freedom, complete access to news, no censorship and rapid communications of news to the audience by media. Conversely, the military wants restricted access and control of information. The media believe that attempts by the military to restrict access only aim at protecting their mistakes and enhancing their public image. These issues and differences remain crucial to relationships between the media and the milita ry. The media and military can work together. However, there is always a strange sense of animosity that can ruin such efforts of working together. This happens due to lack of understanding between the media and the military. Based on their opposing objectives and missions, the relationship between the media and military shall remain strained. Literature review In the beginning of the Vietnam War, many correspondents expressed their supports for the war. At the time, the media did not question the US involvement in the Vietnam War. In fact, the media roles were to inform the US public and portray positive sides of the war. However, this trend changed with the Vietnam War as reporters and photographs started questioning the US government intentions and its roles in the war. The media focused on doubts and growing numbers of war casualties. As a result, the public changed its opinion about the war. Reporters and photographers portrayed sad pictures and horrifying scenes of the Vietnam War. According to Allen and Seaton, wrong representations of war by photojournalists can create confusion and misunderstanding among audience (Allen and Seaton, 1999). These authors argue that media coverage is responsible for misunderstanding due to lack of adequate information. For instance, media portrayed that the US was losing the war and that there were increasing casualties and atrocities. Scholars have noted that this happened because of total freedom the media got in covering the Vietnam War and reporting what they wished. This is how the media bias influenced Americans against the war. On the other hand, Allan highlights how the Vietnam War changed war reporting today.Advertising Looking for dissertation on art and design? Let's see if we can help you! Get your first paper with 15% OFF Learn More This is what he refers to as objective reporting in the mass media (Allan, 2010). Allan looks at factors like cultural dynamism, racism, and sexism, and how they shape news reporting. The author also takes into consideration the role of various institutions, viewers, and practices of the media in reporting news. As the media started to report atrocities of the war and its politics, the public confidence changed. Americans doubted the government’s account about the war. The media resorted to investigative journalism in order to ascertain facts behind news the government released to the public. Before then, Allen and Seaton noted that media portrayal of wars fuelled hatred and ethnic loyalties. They also depicted how relying on vague and unfounded claims could trigger negative perceptions about the war (Allen and Seaton, 1999). Photographs and reports played significant roles in changing the public opinion against the government and the war. Misrepresentation of information by the media led the public to believe that the US soldiers had lost the war. The media acted as crucial sources of information for the public. On this note, Altheide notes that mass media can shape the content and form of war experiences (Altheide, 2009). Altheide focuses on mass media and their effects on propaganda, war on terrorism, and events after the 9/11 twin attacks. The author argues that it is fear that is responsible for the changing discourse and social meanings of wars. The author further looks at intervention strategies and how media stories influence future responses. Following claims that the US could not win the War at Tet Offensive, the US government decided that the public should receive optimistic news. This marked the regulation of contents the public could access. Since the US government did not censor news reporting, the public could receive photographs and live horrors of the war. People made films and accessed brutal images of the war. Photographs of the war s hocked the general public and significantly shifted the people’s opinion against the war. At the same time, â€Å"power of photography came to light, and how it could show brutality and assaults of the war† (Allan, 2010). Both still and moving pictures had significant influences about the horror of the war. Whereas the Vietnam War representations in motion pictures took new turns with symbols, images, and metaphors, still pictures remained factual representations of the war. Consequently, scholars have studied major themes relating to social, political, and cultural meanings of these films (Auster and Quart, 1988). The famous photo where General Nguyen Ngoc Loan executes a Viet Cong soldier in the street of Saigon (Tet Execution) has gained recognition over time. The General shot the soldier in a street before cameras. This photograph was responsible for increasing resentment among Americans about the war. This execution helped people change their opinions about the wa r and the role of the US government in the Vietnam War. Another photograph of interest is the photo of â€Å"a nine-year-old girl fleeing naked and shouting after sustaining serious burn from the napalm† (Accidental Napalm 1972). There were also other photographs of massive influence. These included a photo of a Buddhist monk protesting against the war by burning himself to death, and at home, the Kent State University protest. These photographs played crucial roles in bringing real images of the war to the public. Americans did not like what they saw on televisions and read on newspapers. Cottle observes that news and reporting are not neutral among different cultures. As a result, messages have cultural meanings and assumptions about various societies (Cottle, 2004). Photographs are best forms of representations. However, in the modern time, influences of photographs representation in wars have stirred different political and ideological concerns. We cannot separate photogr aph representations from the culture of journalism and the public they serve. Allen and Seaton note that media reporting should go behind ethnicity and relations to cultural context when reporting events (Allen and Seaton, 1999). They note that due to lack of sufficient information, the media may create misunderstanding. According to these authors, ethnicity is dynamic and has different constructions. Contemporary society has come with methods of regulating access to information, pictures and films through rating their contents to different viewers. This is a way of creating and enhancing preferred values and ideologies among viewers. However, restrictions of representations can achieve limited result. This is because images can have their own lives before the audience. In addition, they cannot have fixed and concrete meaning. Representations of images always create a gap between intended meanings and realized meanings. From the above observation, we can note that representations ma y create errors, misunderstanding, and inconsistency. Thus, we cannot guarantee factual representations based on interpretation of signs in various cultures. According to Andersen, the relationship between the media and war is deep. She notes that the focus is on the public’s perception (Andersen, 2006). Therefore, reporting helps in justification of wars and influence future wars. The author argues that war consists of â€Å"death and suffering, protest and pain, guilt and abuse and struggle for representation† (Andersen, 2006). However, this representation has changed over time as methods of reporting have changed, and censorship and propaganda have acquired new meanings. The author argues that technology has transformed representation of war as the film industry has changed wars into forms of entertainment. On war and propaganda, Hammond notes that changes have occurred. He concludes that Western military operation has acquired new dimensions of representation using new technologies that promote propaganda (Hammond, 2007; Cottle, 2004). In this view, Hammond notes that the media only serves to accelerate wars due to diverse misconceptions and political interests. The author also observes that power is at the central, and its projection leads to a lack of cohesion and orientation at home. Anderegg and Grey looked at various films representing the Vietnam War and noted that such representations used myths and metaphors in order to reflect glamorised standards of Hollywood (Anderegg, 1991; Grey, 1992). Anderegg also noted that later representations of the Vietnam War strived to capture real events but with new twists and myths. The author was keen on representations of issues regarding â€Å"power and powerlessness of victims and soldiers, gender roles, and racial views these films captured† (Anderegg, 1991). He also noted how teaching of the Vietnam War changed regarding contents and the intended audience. Photographs acted as means of re presenting the war in Vietnam to Americans. The US public believed that photographs had accurate representations of the war. The reasons for the US withdrawal from the war may not be certain. However, it is clear that photos and live reporting of events significantly swayed the public opinion about the war. Gilboa takes a cross-cultural look in an attempt to understand the relationship between media and wars. The author notes that media reporting is necessary in conflict management, resolution and transformation. In this case, the media influence conflict representation particularly with identity and ethnicity (Gilboa, 2002). According to Der Derian, technology and video game industry have created flawed systems in real wars and responses (Der Derian, 2009; Franklin, 2000). According to the author, the US has blundered due to over reliance on technology, virtue, and threats of terror. He also notes that technological representations of wars depict a low risk affair. Representations of the Vietnam War took different aspects. Hixson portrays various ways in which people have kept memories of the war (Hixson, 2000). However, these representations deviated from actual events as films begun to produce motion pictures for commercial purposes. According to Sturken, representations of the Vietnam War and AIDS epidemic have transformed the US culture. The author looks at effects of camera images on cultural memory, media fantasy, trauma that survivors experience and how healing processes can smooth tensions. Scholars portray a culture of amnesia among Americans when it comes to recalling events of war (Sturken, 1997; Buzzanco, 1999). Analytic section From the Vietnam War, we can note three significant events. First, photojournalism changed the history of war reporting. Second, the media attempts to reveal the truth led Americans to doubt their government. Finally, televisions and photographs were significant in shaping the public’s perceptions about the war. Cri tics believe that the media had a negative impact on Americans regarding the outcome of the Vietnam War. The media reporting portrayed images of horror that the public could not withstand. We must understand that the media supported this war during early stages of the US involvement. However, television coverage and photographs changed Americans perception about the war. The biased reporting only concentrated on actions of the US soldiers and ignored atrocities that North Vietnam committed. As a result, the anti-war demonstrations gained the media attention. Journalists and media pundits have debated the war reporting and its impacts on the public for many years. However, critics believe that it is only veterans who can give true accounts of the war. This is because media main concerns are reporting events without understanding their meanings. As a result, war veterans believed that the television reporting distorted news by misrepresentation. For instance, they made the public beli eve that the US had lost the war while reality at the field was different. Critics also believe that the media portrayed anti-war demonstrators as traitors. The media claimed that anti-war demonstrators were sympathizers of the US enemies. In addition, the media only concentrated on violet aspects of the anti-war demonstrations. Critics believed that the media engaged in extremism so as to gain the public’s attention. As a result, the anti-war movement gained popularity through defiant definitions that various media portrayed. This is manipulation of the media. It created a distant public from the government. The media ignored values and ideas the anti-war movement proclaimed. Instead, it concentrated on portraying violence associated with the protest. Media scholars also believe that pessimistic war intentions did not originate from the media. This happened because the public did not understand the working style of the media. In fact, people believed that the media were mere transmitters of facts and news as they happened at the battle field. In this regard, the critical role many scholars attribute to media is beyond their attention. Changes in reporting styles after the Tet Offensive simply reflected changes in events of the war, sources, and the government role in attempts to regulate contents. In addition, the media reporting of the anti-war movement showed that they were not responsible for actions of protestors. Photographs have remained vital sources of information. Photographs are easier to recall than words. Images can influence or trigger different emotions in people. As a result, such emotions influence interpretation of photos. Influences of photos vary from individuals. However, scholars generally agree that photos have high capacity for memory, are less complex than words, and appeal to majorities. People may debate on what features make images or photos iconic. The Accidental Napalm photo remains an iconic image of the Vietnam War. This is because the image of a naked running girl cannot easily disappear from Americans’ minds. This image shows cruelty of the war. This photo attained the status of an iconic image because everyone could recognize and understand it. It captures a moment of history and creates a strong sense of emotions among audience. This photo had the capacity to ignite various views about the war. The media made the image and distributed it within their systems making the photo an icon. It created waves of negative reactions, prominence, subject of the war, and cultural aspects. Accidental Napalm photo is an image reflecting the nudity of the burning and shouting girl. This photo violated cultural concerns about nudity in order to excite debate about immorality of the war. The public should not have access to this picture. It shows what we should not see and an event that should not have occurred. In views of feminists, the naked girl depicts a victimized female figure during wars. This is t o say it is the women and children who suffer in the event of any war. There is a clear difference between the soldiers walking and children running from terror. The image can also lead to question the responsibility of soldiers to children during times of wars. The public cannot control their emotions when confronted with this photo. The photo evokes a sense of terror, pain, and pity. This photo remains the significant work of photojournalism in the history of war. A semiotic analysis reveals that attentions of viewers are on the nude girl. The photo does not provide much detail. However, we can see that the war claimed the innocence of a young girl rendering her nude and powerless before the soldiers and photographers who captured her nudity. The boy in the photo depicts terror of the war. All the children in this photo depict stiff contrast from the soldiers herding them down the street. It is also significant to note that these children do not have any parents in the photo. It r emains unclear whether the war had claimed their parents. The action of directing these children may show power of the soldiers over the war victims. The photo’s background shows thick and dark smoke. The dark smoke shows an image of threatening and risky situation during the battle. â€Å"The children from left to right are: Phan Thanh Tam, younger brother of Kim Phuc, who lost an eye, Phan Thanh Phouc, youngest brother of Kim Phuc, Kim Phuc, and Kim’s cousins Ho Van Bon, and Ho Thi Ting. Behind them are soldiers of the Vietnam Army 25th Division, June 8, 1972† (Nick Ut/AP Photo). Another photo of interest is the Tet Execution. The photo shows General Nguyen Ngoc Loan as he shoots a captured Viet Cong enemy at a close range. The national televisions aired this execution. However, it is the still picture that grabbed the viewers’ attention. The photo highlighted the facial expression of the war captive than did the live coverage of televisions. The photo became an iconic image because of the prominence and instantaneous influence it achieved. Still photos remain the most influential forms of representation in the world. The General and enemy only have a small gun between them. The photo is simple, but it shows the reality of war i.e. man-to-man confrontation where the aggressor and enemy are face-to-face. This photo shows the real brutality of the Vietnam War. The General does not indicate any emotion. The act of executing enemies is normal to him. On the other hand, Viet Cong’s expression generates feelings of empathy among audience. DURING: 1 February 1968 the national police chief of South Vietnam, General Nguyen Ngoc Loan shooting the enemy suspect in the head (Eddie Adams photo). The photo of Tet Execution shows how photography achieved influence in the photojournalism. We cannot assume the fact that the General was aware of the presence of the camera. Thus, he turned his back to hide his feelings and purpose. Converse ly, we can see an expression of a man waiting for the unknown in the prisoner. The prisoner’s dress code and hair are the opposite of the General who expresses power in his military attire. The prisoner may not be a military officer after all. Instead, he might be a civilian experiencing the cruelty of the war. The General shows disregard for the normal justice system. This image only depicts hatred that exists among soldiers during wars. The war depicted a show of power among soldiers (Anderegg, 1991). The General clearly expresses and flexes his muscles as he prepares to shoot his victim. On the other hand, the victim remains powerless since his hands are behind his back, tied thus, denying him the chance to defend himself. The victim’s acceptance of his fate is evident in his motionless body. The prisoner knows it is pointless in trying to defend himself or escape. There is also a soldier who cannot believe the proceeding event. As a result, he is holding his teeth tightly because of this inhumane act. The soldier has protective helmet, unlike the Viet Cong captive. This Tet Execution arouses feelings of empathy and portrays the General as a villain and the prisoner as a hero. We cannot completely understand circumstances of the photo. However, we can note that it is inhumane act against a helpless war victim. Therefore, the photo communicates the main act of war, which is to kill an enemy. As a result, viewers could experience atrocities that permeated the Vietnam War. In the view of Donald and McDonald, the image of Tet Execution can have significant influence on reinforcing masculinity among boys (Donald and MacDonald, 2011). The General’s victory over the victim can aid in reinforcing the male stereotype associated with combats and winning as these images are responsible for defining manly courage. Such images depicting the apotheosis of the US soldiers in wars are the current representations of the Vietnam War in various media as S locum portrays (Slocum, 2006; Lembcke, 1998). Conclusions Various scholars have expressed their ideas about the relationship between the media and war. From this point, we can understand the impact of iconic images of the Vietnam War through semiotic analysis. These photos show general features of powerlessness, emotions, and innocence that were present in the Vietnam War. We can now understand why these photos triggered emotions among American audience. The Accidental Napalm and Tet Execution arouse strong emotions of panic, fear, and pain among viewers making them iconic images of the war. Semiotic analyses of these photos show that they are capable of arousing strong emotions among viewers. Viewers can easily relate these photos to distress, loss of lives, unpleasant experiences, and terror of the war. These photos are icons of outrage and atrocities of the war, and viewers not accustomed to such scenes can easily have negative emotions. Photographs also captured innocence of the victims. These photos showed how innocent victims lost their lives during the war. The Tet Execution depicts the prisoner as an ordinary citizen and not an army officer. However, we learned that the victim was a Viet Cong soldier. The inhumane execution of this soldier shows disregard for the rule of the law and deviation from the concept of the war. The Accidental Napalm shows the innocence of the children caught in the middle of the battle. The photo depicts how the war stripped the little girl’s innocence. The absence of any parent in the photo also raises concerns about the fate of these children. The war has left these children to fend for each other. These photos also depict war victims who have no power to defend themselves. The Viet Cong is unable to defend himself against the General and soldiers. This sense of powerlessness reflects what the war has caused in South Vietnam. The little girl also remains powerless to events taking place in her country. These photos r emain crucial in representations of the Vietnam War. They also mark the role of photojournalism in depicting actual images of the war. Reference List Allan, S 2010, News Culture, Open University Press, New York. Allen, T and Seaton, J 1999, The Media of Conflict: War Reporting and Representations of Ethnic Violence, Zed Books, New York. Altheide, D 2009, Terror Post-9/11 and Media, Peter Lang, New York. Anderegg, M 1991, Inventing Vietnam: The War in Film and Television, Temple University Press, Philadelphia. Andersen, R 2006, A Century of Media, a Century of War, Peter Lang, New York. Auster, A and Quart, L 1988, How the War was Remembered: Hollywood and Vietnam, Praeger, New York. Buzzanco, R 1999, Vietnam and the Transformation of American Life, Blackwell Publishers, Malden. Cottle, S 2004, News, Public Relations and Power, Sage, London. Der Derian, J 2009, Virtuous War: Mapping the Military-Industrial-Media- Entertainment Network, 2nd edn, Westview Press, Colorado. Donald, R and MacDonald, K 2011, Reel Men at War: Masculinity and the American War Film, Scarecrow Press, Lanham MD. Franklin, B 2000, Vietnam and Other American Fantasies, University of Massachusetts Press, Amherst. Gilboa, E 2002, Media and Conflict: Framing Issues, Making Policy, Shaping Opinions, Transnational, Ardsley, NY. Grey, J 1992, Vietnam: War, Myth and Memory: Comparative Perspectives on Australias War, Allen Unwin, St Leonards. Hammond, P 2007, Media, War and Postmodernity, Routledge, London. Hixson, W 2000, Historical Memory and Representations of the Vietnam War, Garland Publishers, New York. Lembcke, J 1998, The Spitting Image: Myth, Memory, and the Legacy of Vietnam, New York UP, New York. Slocum, D 2006, Hollywood and War, The Film Reader, Routledge, London. Sturken, M 1997, Tangled Memories: The Vietnam War, the AIDS Epidemic, and the Politics of Remembering, University of California Press, Berkeley. Appendices Bombs with a mixture of napalm and white phosphorus jelly droppe d by Vietnamese Air Force Skyraider bombers explode across Route 1, amid homes and in front of the Cao Dai temple on the outskirts of Trang Bang, Vietnam, June 8, 1972. (Nick Ut/AP Photo) Nick Ut took this image seconds after his famous shot, of Kim Phuc running down the street. Television crews and South Vietnamese troops surround 9-year-old Kim Phuc on Route 1 near Trang Bang, South Vietnam, after she was burned by a misdirected aerial napalm attack, June 8, 1972. (Nick Ut/AP) Phan Tai Kim Phuc, 9, is comforted by her mother in a Saigon, Vietnam, hospital, two days after she was severely burned during a misplaced napalm attack on her village, June 10, 1972.(Robinson/AP Photo) From right, Associated Press staff photographer Nick Ut, Phan Thi Kim Phuc and Dr. My Le, who treated Kim Phuc two days after a napalm attack in Vietnam 40 years ago, sit together during a reunion in Buena Park, Calif., June 2, 2012. (Jae C. Hong/AP Photo) Britain’s Queen Elizabeth II, right, opens the new Welcome Wing of London‘s Science Museum with Associated Press photographer Nick Ut, left and Phan Thi Kim Phuc, centre, June 27, 2000. Ut’s image of Kim is featured in the museum. (Ian Jones/AP Photo) BEFORE: South Vietnamese forces escort suspected Viet Cong officer Nguyen Van Lem (also known as Bay Lop) on a Saigon street Feb. 1, 1968, early in the Tet Offensive. (AP Photo/Eddie Adams AFTER: The victim falls dead on the ground and police chief calmly puts the gun back January 9, 1964 a soldier of the Army of South Vietnam stabs a farmer, assuming that he was lying on the movements of the Viet Cong North Vietnamese soldiers. (AP Photo/Horst Faas)

Saturday, February 22, 2020

LAW OF BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS BENCHMARK ASSIGNMENT #4

LAW OF BANKING AND FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS BENCHMARK #4 - Assignment Example As such, the nature of their duties requires that they possess certain characteristics or attributes. Largely, the agents are required to portray attributes of independence, persuasion, problem-solving skills, and interpersonal skills. With regard to independence attribute, the real estate agents are expected to engage and manage their own schedules and times in ensuring that they hustle to get word out on the specific properties that they are promoting, as well as ensuring that they find the exact information that is required by their clients. By being persuasive, the agents, based on their skills should be able to convince clients to either buy or sell properties through them at the appropriate prices, so as to gain profit out of the dealings. Subsequently, they are expected to use persuasion to get the bets deals and to successfully close the deals. By possessing interpersonal skills, the real estate agents are anticipated to labor with their clients and customers on a face-to-face basis and at all times, they are required to portray proper manners and the level of handling of clients should be highly rated. This skill also goes hand in hand with the listening skills in which the agents are to apply towards the attainment of effective communication with the clients pleasantly and effectively. The problem-solving skills are meant to enable the agents to quickly and promptly find solutions to matters that might arise in their dealings with the clients at various times and levels. This skill also enables the real estate agent to act as a moderator and mediator between the buyers and sellers of the various real estate properties that are sanctioned under their guidance. In other contexts, real estate agents are required to possess attributes such as honesty and integrity, being self-motivated and having a desire to